About the U.S. Senate:

Two U.S. Senators are elected per state for six-year terms. Both the Senate and House have oversight of the federal budget. The 100-member Senate has the power to originate legislation, draft or amend bills, and filibuster (delay or block legislation via prolonged debate).

The Basics of the U.S. Senate:

Two U.S. Senators are elected per state for six-year terms. Both the Senate and House have oversight of the federal budget. The 100-member Senate has the power to originate legislation, draft or amend bills, and filibuster (delay or block legislation via prolonged debate). It takes 60 votes for cloture of such debate. The Senate has oversight of the Executive Branch, approving or rejecting presidential appointees for agencies. The Senate has sole power of any impeachment trial of Executive and judicial officials and can override a presidential veto of a bill. There are 20 committees in the Senate.

Detailed Rules and Responsibilities of the U.S. Senate:

Two U.S. Senators are elected per state for six-year terms. Both the Senate and House have oversight of the federal budget. The 100-member Senate has the power to originate legislation, draft or amend bills, and filibuster (delay or block legislation via prolonged debate). It takes 60 votes for cloture of such debate. The Senate has oversight of the Executive Branch, approving or rejecting presidential appointees for agencies. The Senate has sole power of any impeachment trial of Executive and judicial officials, with a two-thirds vote required for conviction. A two-thirds vote also can override a presidential veto of a bill. The Senate ratifies treaties with other nations that were negotiated by the Executive Branch. The Vice President is recognized as the President of the Senate but has no vote except in the case of a tie. There are 20 committees in the Senate, which is part of the Legislative Branch of government.


Additional Information

Definitions provided by Arizona State University Morrison Institute for Public Policy.