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About the U.S. Supreme Court:

The U.S. Supreme Court is the highest court in the nation and has nine judges. It has the final say in any appeal from a lower court ruling. As head of the Judicial Branch, the Supreme Court has the duty to protect civil rights and liberties by striking down laws that violate the U.S. Constitution. A Supreme Court justice is a non-elected post appointed by the President and holds the position for life.

The Basics of the U.S. Supreme Court:

The U.S. Supreme Court is the highest court in the nation and has nine judges. It serves as the last appellate court, meaning it has the final say in any appeal from a lower court ruling. As head of the Judicial Branch, the Supreme Court has the duty to protect civil rights and liberties by striking down laws that violate the U.S. Constitution. The Supreme Court has the power of judicial review, meaning it can declare legislation or an Executive Act as unconstitutional. A Supreme Court justice is a non-elected post appointed by the President, and upon Senate confirmation holds the position for life.

Detailed Rules and Responsibilities of the U.S. Supreme Court:

The U.S. Supreme Court is the highest court in the nation and has nine judges. It serves as the last appellate court, meaning it has the final say in any appeal from a lower court ruling. As head of the Judicial Branch, the Supreme Court has the duty to protect civil rights and liberties by striking down laws that violate the U.S. Constitution. The Supreme Court has original jurisdiction on certain cases, such as lawsuits between two states. The high court is able to choose cases it wants to review, generally reviewing questions of constitutionality. If the Supreme Court chooses not to review a case, the ruling of the lower court stands. The Supreme Court has the power of judicial review, meaning it can declare legislation or an Executive Act as unconstitutional. A Supreme Court justice is a non-elected post appointed by the President, and upon Senate confirmation holds the position for life, or until the justice chooses to resign.


Additional Information

Definitions provided by Arizona State University Morrison Institute for Public Policy.