About the Governor:

The Governor is similar to a company’s CEO, representing Arizona as the top elected officer in state business and functions in both official and ceremonial events. The Governor can sign a legislative bill into law or veto it to keep it from becoming law.

The Basics of the Governor:

The Governor is similar to a company’s CEO, representing Arizona as the top elected officer in state business and functions in both official and ceremonial events. The Governor heads the Executive Branch of state government and holds great power in the budgeting process, as well as having authority over the appointment of state department directors and the Arizona Supreme Court. The Governor can appoint a replacement to a vacated seat in the U.S. Senate if that elected official leaves offices before a scheduled election. The Governor can sign a bill into law, allow it to become law without his/her signature or veto the bill to prevent it from taking effect and sending it back to the Legislature. By state law, the Governor is limited to two consecutive terms for a maximum of eight years.

Detailed Rules and Responsibilities of the Governor:

The Governor is similar to a company’s CEO, representing Arizona as the top elected officer in state business and functions in both official and ceremonial events. The Governor heads the Executive Branch of state government and holds great power in the budgeting process, as well as having authority over the appointment of state department directors and the Arizona Supreme Court. The Governor can appoint a replacement to a vacated seat in the U.S. Senate if that elected official leaves offices before a scheduled election. The Governor can sign a bill into law, allow it to become law without his/her signature or veto the bill to prevent it from taking effect and sending it back to the Legislature, which can either let stand the veto or vote to overturn it by two-thirds vote. The Governor usually sets the stage for his/her agenda in January with the State of the State address before the Legislative session opens. The Governor also can sign executive orders in certain circumstances for immediate action, bypassing the Legislature. The Governor also has authority to call the Legislature into Special Session to deal with a particular issue of importance, unfinished business or emergency. The Governor can grant reprieves, commutation and pardons, after convictions, for all offenses except treason and cases of impeachment. The Governor also is Commander-in-Chief of the state’s National Guard. Under state law, the Governor is limited to two consecutive terms for a maximum of eight years. There is no lieutenant governor in Arizona, meaning the Secretary of State is next in line in succession should the Governor leave office due to death, resignation or impeachment.


Additional Information

Definitions provided by Arizona State University Morrison Institute for Public Policy.